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TOPIC: Alaskan native species
#8085
lkittle (User)
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Re:Alaskan native species 9 Years, 6 Months ago Karma: 0  
Hi guys I don't want to bust anyones bubble but Lts when mature would make that worm look small they are 6-10 inches long and .25 inches in diameter. I raise Lts and when they are 2.5-3.5 inches they don't even have a ciltellium evident. That is a adult worm and is small and skinny. I'll stick with the dendrobaena octaedra right size and color. I'll bet it didn't have a flatened out tail so that rules both Lumbricus terrestris and rubellus out.
 
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larry
Holley,New York
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#8087
AK Red Neck (User)
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Re:Alaskan native species 9 Years, 6 Months ago Karma: 0  
Back to square 1!
I took pictures of several worms found in the same samll area after a recent rain. They were all approx. 2.5 to 3.5 inches in length and 1/16 - 1/8 inch thick. All also had hte dark red/purple head with lighter tail end. The tail was not flattened but remained pointed even after picking them up and handling.

Larry the pictures/ description of dendrobaena octaedra i found described a larger/ thicker worm, do you have other photos i can compare it with?

Found this articla at science direct.com "Small Dendrobaena earthworms survive freezing better than large worms" Article details a test that showed that smaller worms in Sweden were better able to survive freezing temps than larger worms. So theoreticly We could have dwarf DO's up here due to our temps.
 
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Jeremy
Sterling, Alaska
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#8088
lkittle (User)
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Re:Alaskan native species 9 Years, 6 Months ago Karma: 0  
I'll try to put the link in. I googled the full name and the first site on the list is photos click the photo to enlarge it. Dendro are the size you are measuring. To be more positive pick one up and check to see if the ciltellum is all the way around or more saddle like. If its the saddle type its more likly the Do.

Link:This is a link

Link:
This is a link





Post edited by: lkittle, at: 2008/09/27 13:02

Post edited by: lkittle, at: 2008/09/27 13:27<br><br>Post edited by: lkittle, at: 2008/09/27 13:28
 
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larry
Holley,New York
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#8096
AK Red Neck (User)
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Re:Alaskan native species 9 Years, 6 Months ago Karma: 0  
Thanks for the links! Unfortunately we may never know for sure what it was. I don't recall if the ciltellum went all the way around or not. I only picked 1 up to look at and only handled it for a few seconds before putting it back. In my defence I was running to catch a plane, next time I'll bring a few home with me for further study.
 
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Jeremy
Sterling, Alaska
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#8098
lkittle (User)
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Re:Alaskan native species 9 Years, 6 Months ago Karma: 0  
Hi ARK! When I started into the worming thing and knew I would be buying some worms to start out. I did lots of reserch to make sure I could identify the worms, I was receiving. So I looked up all the different species on taxinomy sites and sites with pics. I first was bookmarking them but the mark list was to long. I wrote some of the better ones down in my worm info pad. Still a long list but as time goes by and I don't use them I remove them use space for new ones.

Just to let you know through lots of reserch I have found its next to impossible to keep several species in close proximity and be certain every worm in a biomass is of a single species. So when you buy worms not only are they all ages but more likely multi species. I only ordered two species of worms Efs and Ehs. I am quite sure I own several others along with them. I suspect I have some Pes. Lrs, plus two or three others that all get along with each other. When harvesting the worms I find adult worms of various colors and ciltellum type (all around),saddle type. They normally wiggle too much to inspect under a microscope for pore locations and seate types and locations, pairing and such. So I just put them all back togather and split without really sorting. Some day I may just decide to do the sorting thing using the easy to see differences. Mostly to satisfy my own courisity.
 
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larry
Holley,New York
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#8099
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Re:Alaskan native species 9 Years, 6 Months ago Karma: 0  
I try to keep my indoor bins separate by about 10 feet in the garage to keep them pure of species but like WistarWorms says &quot;we are worm, resistance is futile&quot;.

I have seen ENC checking out my EF's housing. I figure they a just checking out how the other half lives. When I find a visitor I chuck him to the chickens to teach the other a lesson. I'd like to TRY and keep them separated for ease during harvest time.
 
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Jeremy
Sterling, Alaska
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